Introduction

Whether you have just taken up the guitar, or you have been playing for a while and need some guidance, this site is for you. ElectricGuitarTutor.com is a guide for the guitarist with different courses for different abilities. The first course is for the complete beginner and starts with the basics. Each lesson progresses from the one before, although each lesson can also be used in isolation if you prefer.

How to use the site

If you are a complete beginner, start from the first lesson and work gradually through each one in order. The first lessons are very simple, so you could tackle more than one at a time if you find that you are making quick progress. If you feel that you are a bit further on than a beginner, you could dip into the lessons where you like, using the titles as a guide. When you get to lesson five, try going back to lesson one for a recap. This will reinforce the lessons in your mind. Repeat this idea throughout the lessons. At lesson six, recap lesson two and so on. The later lessons will suggest this anyway.

How often should I practice

Practice every day, if possible. It's better to start off with five to ten minutes a day than for thirty minutes once a week. Practice Tip. Try not to leave your guitar in it's case. Have it on a stand or hanging on the wall so that it's easy to pick it up and just start playing.

Feedback

We'd be interested in any thoughts you have about the lessons. If you have any feedback on how they could be made clearer, or disagree with any of the techniques or approaches, please contact us using the email address in the Contact Us section.

For the teacher

Someone thinking of taking up the electric guitar is usually slightly older than the classical guitar beginner, very often a teenager. They've got musical tastes of their own, which made them want to play in the first place and it can be pretty frustrating for them when they can't quickly make a good sound on their recently acquired guitar. Their boredom threshold can be pretty low and you need to work harder to keep their interest up. Teaching the classical guitar can in some ways be easier than the electric guitar, although of course it is just as hard to master as a player. Many years ago, the author of this site came across a great beginners classical guitar tutorial, 'Learn to Play Guitar' by Debbie Cracknell, and has used it with many students since then. That tutorial has a progressive and instructive approach which works really well, especially with young children. It is difficult to find an equivalent book for the electric guitar and this site is an attempt to fill that gap. One tempation when teahing the electric guitar is to just show the beginner a few open chords and get them strumming away on some three chord tricks. While this may keep them interested to begin with, it does both the student and the instrument a bit of a disservice. The approach taken with these lessons trys to strike a balance between a solid grounding and keeping the student interested by having some fun things to try out.